Tag Archives: clogged nozzles

Moving Heads

Have you been told to “Move Some Heads” on your irrigation system?

Why would an irrigation service technician suggest this?

As homeowners, our yards and landscaped areas change over time for a variety of reasons:

  • Decks, Screened Porches or Patios are added to our homes and yards
  • Borders change
  • Shrubs and gardens grow and expand
  • Swing sets, hot tubs and other fun toys are added
  • And so on….

The Solution:

A trained irrigation technician can move heads to accommodate the landscape change(s) so that the intended turf or landscape can more effectively and efficiently be watered.  Some systems are built with saddles and swing pipe while others are built with risers, and still others are built in a variety of unique ways.  A properly trained technician, coupled with a properly stocked service vehicle, can accomplish these head movements with relative ease.  More importantly, there is little or no damage to the turf and landscape while moving the heads, so in no time, the yard will recover and the irrigation system will perform much better.

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Match Precipitation Rates

Does your system have “Mixed Precipitation Rates” in the same zone?  Meaning, does the zone have “mixed head types” (Rotor Heads and Spray Heads)?

What does this mean?

A standard Rotor Head (3.0 gal/min. nozzle at 45 lbs. of pressure) will deliver 0.37 – 0.42 inches of precipitation per hour.

A standard Spray Nozzle (RainBird 10′ radius, 180 degree at 30 lbs. of pressure) will deliver 1.45 gal/min. totalling 2.80 – 3.23 inches of precipitation per hour.

What does this mean?  The Spray Heads in the zone are delivering 6 – 8 times more water (precipitation rate) than the Rotor Heads.  Since controllers run your sprinkler system per zone, that means that you are way over-watering the smaller areas of the zone (spray heads) while more correctly watering the larger areas (Rotor Heads).  Or, if you change the controller to water less time to accommodate the Spray Heads, then you are way under-watering the larger areas (Rotor Heads).

The Solution:

Remove the standard spray nozzle from the Spray Heads and replace them with a Toro Precision™ Rotating Nozzle  (the nozzles can easily be swapped without digging our or changing the Spray Head) to more closely match the precipitation rates of the Rotor and Spray Heads.  A Toro Precision™ Spray Nozzle set at 180 degrees at 40 – 50 lbs. of pressure will deliver a precipitation rate of 0.56 – 0.64 inches per hour, which more closely resembles the rate of the Rotor Head.  Therefore, the zone can be watered more evenly – even though there are two different types of heads on the zone.

 

Broken or Inoperable Spray Heads

Upon inspection, a Spray Head may be found to be broken or inoperable. The most common observations include:

  • Broken Head – due to external forces – snow plow, lawn mower, vandalism, accidental damage by human or animal, driving over while operating.
  • Bad Seal – due to intrusion of sand or grit, aging/dried-out seal, external forces, such as stepping on or driving over while operating.

Ultimately, the easiest and most cost-effective solution is to replace the head. New spray heads (including the Precision™ Series Spray Nozzle or Precision™ Series Rotating Nozzle) come with a one year warranty on parts and labor and installation takes about the same amount or less time than repairing a damaged rotor head.

Broken or Inoperable Rotor Heads

Broken or Inoperable Rotor Heads

Upon inspection, a Rotor Head may be found to be broken or inoperable.  The most common observations include:

  • Broken Head – due to external forces – snow plow, lawn mower, vandalism, accidental damage by human or animal, driving over while operating.
  • Bad Seal – due to intrusion of sand or grit, aging/dried-out seal, external forces, such as stepping on or driving over while operating.
  • Not Rotating – due to wear and tear, sand or grit, damaged caused by external forces.

Ultimately, the easiest and most cost-effective solution is to replace the head.  New rotor heads come with a one year warranty on parts and labor and installation takes about the same amount or less time than repairing a damaged rotor head.

Clogged Spray Nozzles

Clogged Spray Nozzles

Upon inspection, a Spray Nozzle may be found to be clogged or inoperable. The most common observations include:

  • Clogged Nozzle – due to sediment or debris in the irrigation water.  This may occur immediately after installation due to construction debris or rocks and dirt being in the sprinkler lines, or may simply occur over time with sediment entering the nozzle after the system runs.

Ultimately, the easiest and most cost-effective solution is to replace the spray nozzle. New Precision™ Series Spray Nozzles come with a one year warranty on parts and labor and installation takes about the same amount or less time than repairing a clogged nozzle.